The early journalism of Sara Jeannette Duncan

with a chapter of biography
  • 337 Pages
  • 4.58 MB
  • 9543 Downloads
  • English
by
University of Toronto , Toronto
Criticism and interpretation, Journ
StatementRae E. Goodwin
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPS8455.O7 Z7
The Physical Object
Paginationxi, 337 leaves :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL26571770M

The early journalism of Sara Jeannette Duncan: with a chapter of biography by Goodwin, Rae E. Publication date Borrow this book to access EPUB and PDF files. Books to Borrow. Books for People with Print Disabilities.

Trent University Library Donation. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by stationcebu on J SIMILAR Pages: Marian Fowler, Redney: a life of Sara Jeannette Duncan (Toronto, ). Carole Gerson, A purer taste: the writing and reading of fiction in English in nineteenth-century Canada (Toronto, ).

Goodwin, “The early journalism of Sara Jeannette Duncan, with a. Book Description: In the The early journalism of Sara Jeannette Duncan book nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, journalism, politics, and social advocacy were largely male preserves.

Six women, however, did manage to come to prominence through The early journalism of Sara Jeannette Duncan book writing and public performance: Agnes Maule Machar, Sara Jeannette Duncan, E.

Pauline Johnson, Kathleen Blake Coleman, Flora MacDonald Denison, and Nellie L. McClung. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, journalism, politics, and social advocacy were largely male preserves.

Six women, however, did manage to come to prominence through their writing and public performance: Agnes Maule Machar, Sara Jeannette Duncan, E. Pauline Johnson, Kathleen Blake Coleman, Flora MacDonald Denison, and Nellie L. by: 8. Sara Jeannette Duncan’s classic portrait of a turn-of-the-century Ontario town, The Imperialist captures the spirit of an emergent nation through the example of two young dreamers.

Impassioned by “the Imperialist idea,” Lorne Murchison rests his bid for office on his vision of a rejuvenated British Empire/5.

In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, journalism, politics, and social advocacy were largely male preserves. Six women, however, did manage to come to prominence through their writing and public performance: Agnes Maule Machar, Sara Jeannette Duncan, E.

Pauline Johnson, Kathleen Blake Coleman, Flora MacDonald Denison, and Nellie L. : Janice Fiamengo. Sara Jeannette Duncan early pieces of journalism, comic novels of manners, and works dealing with more serious social themes.

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In her journalism, Duncan set out many of the major. Sara Jeannette Duncan wrote nearly twenty novels in the years that followed her marriage. Though only two of her novels drew directly on her Canadian experience - including her most brilliant work of fiction, The Imperialist () - she frequently explored the differences between the.

Sara Jeannette Duncan, journalist, novelist (b at Brantford, Canada W 22 Dec ; d at Ashstead, Eng 22 July ). Duncan's notable career as a journalist in the s testifies to her determination and ability.

The first woman employed full time by the Toronto Globeshe also worked for the Montreal Star This edition includes a critical introduction and, in the appendices, excerpts from Sara Jeannette Duncan’s journalism and autobiographical sketches (including an essay on “North American Indians”), speeches by Canadian and British politicians, political cartoons, and recipes for the dishes served at the novel’s social gatherings.

Sara Jeannette Duncan ( - ) was a Canadian author and journalist. She also published as Mrs. Everard Cotes among other names. First trained as a teacher in a normal school, she published poetry early in her life and after a brief period of teaching got a job as a travelling writer for Canadian newspapers and wrote a column for The Globe, a Toronto : Sara Jeannette Duncan.

The eldest daughter in the large family of a Scottish-born father and a mother of Irish origins, Sara Jeannette Duncan () enjoyed a comfortable childhood due to her father's success as a merchant. She attended Central School and Brantford Ladies College, and then trained as a teacher at the Brant County Model school.

A Canadian Author in Chelsea: Sara Jeannette Duncan or Mrs Everard Cotes by Debra Martens Early ina well-travelled couple moved into their newly acquired home at 17 Paultons Square in Chelsea. They were Sara Jeannette Duncan (, a popular novelist and journalist, and her journalist husband Everard Charles Cotes ().

COTES, Mrs. Sara Jeannette Duncan, author and journalist, born in Brentford, Ontario, Canada, in She is most widely known by her maiden name, Sara Jeannette Duncan.

Her PHŒBE COUZINS. father, Charles Duncan, is a merchant of Brantford and a man of wide information and keen intelligence. Her mother is a quick-witted Irish woman. Sara Jeannette Duncan (22 December – 22 July ) was a Canadian author and journalist.

She also published as Mrs. Everard Cotes among other names. First trained as a teacher in a normal school, she published poetry early in her life and after a brief period of teaching got a job as a travelling writer for Canadian newspapers and wrote Brand: Sara Jeannette Duncan.

"In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, journalism, politics, and social advocacy were largely male preserves. Six women, however, did manage to come to prominence through their writing and public performance: Agnes Maule Machar, Sara Jeannette Duncan, E.

Pauline Johnson, Kathleen Blake Coleman, Flora MacDonald Denison, and Nellie L. McClung. Sara Jeannette Duncan (22 December – 22 July ) was a Canadian author and journalist.

Details The early journalism of Sara Jeannette Duncan PDF

She also published as Mrs. Everard Cotes among other names. First trained as a teacher in a normal school, she published poetry early in her life and after a brief period of teaching got a job as a travelling writer for Canadian newspapers and wrote Author: Sara Jeannette Duncan.

(Sara Jeanette Duncan, A Social Departure) (1) In the Canadian writer Sara Jeannette Duncan set off on an ambitious round-the-world trip. She was unmarried and aged just twenty-six, and her decision to embark on such a journey with only another young single woman as a companion was extremely unconventional.

Other articles where Sara Jeannette Duncan is discussed: Canadian literature: Modern period, – mentality” provided the setting for Sara Jeannette Duncan’s portrayal of political life in The Imperialist (), Ralph Connor’s The Man from Glengarry (), Stephen Leacock’s satiric stories Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town (), and Mazo de la Roche’s best-selling Jalna.

Sara Jeannette Duncan Q Sara Jeannette Duncan Sara Jeannette Duncan Duncan,_Sara Jeannette Canadian author and journalist; also known as Sara Jeannette Cotes after her marriage to Everard Cotes inthough is most often referred to by her maiden name. Everard Charles Cotes ( — 4 October ) was an English-born entomologist who worked at the Indian Museum in Calcutta.

He later became a journalist after marrying the famous Canadian journalist, novelist and playwright Sara Jeannette published a number of scientific books and papers on entomology as well as two more journalistic books resulting from his travels. About the Book. Macbeth´s fifth novel, Shackles, a pivotal work of early twentieth-century Canadian literature, recounts a vibrant period of first-wave feminism in published inShackles revovles around a middle-class Canadian woman, Naomi Lennox, and her search for acceptance and respect as a writer.

Besides the protagonist´s struggle for the autonomy in which write. Full Description: "ReCalling Early Canada is the first substantial collection of essays to focus on the production of Canadian literary and cultural works prior to WWI.

Reflecting an emerging critical interest in the literary past, the authors seek to retrieve the early repertoire available to Canadian readers—fiction and poetry certainly, but family letters, photographs, journalism, and.

Get this from a library. The woman's page: journalism and rhetoric in early Canada. [Janice Anne Fiamengo] -- Seeking to return their words to public attention, The Woman's Page demonstrates how these women influenced readers and listeners regarding their society's most controversial issues.

Sara Jeannette Duncan was a Canadian journalist, poet, and novelist whose work spans the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Her writing generally features characters who fail to live up to their own potential, such as Lorne Murchison in The Imperialist, which is probably her best known novels often focus, too, on close female friendships.

Sara Jeannette Duncan had a remarkable career as a journalist and author.

Description The early journalism of Sara Jeannette Duncan FB2

As a pioneering woman journalist from toDuncan challenged social and political conventions by examining women’s changing place in society, the need for a national culture, and Canadian politics.

Her witty and ironic style set her apart from her peers. It’s time to talk about writers who lived abroad. I want to start with a Canadian writer who left home to write and never moved back.

She was given the name Sarah Janet Duncan, but she didn’t write under it, choosing instead Sara Jeannette Duncan, at times using her married name Mrs Everard Cotes, and the pen names Garth Grafton or Jane Wintergreen or V. Cecil Cotes.

Sara Jeannette Duncan GEORGE WOODCOCK Vancouver Sara Jeannette Duncan is a better and more interesting writer than the caprices of posthumous reputation have allowed. For almost forty years of her relatively short life () she was an industrious and capable journalist (writing for Canadian, American, and eventually Indian papers).

On Duncan as a New Woman, see Misao Dean, "Literary Feminism: The Woman Question and the Modern Heroine," in A Different Point of View: Sara Jeannette Duncan (Montreal & Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press, ), ; Denise A.

Heaps, "Genre and Gender in Sara Jeannette Duncan's Travel Satire, A Social Departure: How Orthodocia and I. Canadian Women in Print, — is the first historical examination of women s engagement with multiple aspects of print over some two hundred years, from the settlers who wrote diaries and letters to the New Women who argued for ballots and equal rights.

Considering women s published writing as an intervention in the public sphere of national and material print culture, this book uses Cited by: 4.

Sara Jeannette Duncan (22 December – 22 July ) was a Canadian author and journalist. She also published as Mrs. Everard Cotes among other names. First trained as a teacher in a normal school, she published poetry early in her life and after a brief pe.Duncan returned to Canada from England late inonly to leave in October for India.

According to letters cited by Rae Goodwin in her unpublished M.A. thesis, "The Early Journalism of Sara Jeannette Duncan, with a Chapter on Biography" (), Duncan went to India to work on a newspaper. In she married Everard Cotes, an Anglo-Indian civil.Sara Jeannette Duncan (22 December – 22 July ) was a Canadian author and journalist.

She also published as Mrs. Everard Cotes among other names. First trained as a teacher in a normal school, she published poetry early in her life and after a brief period of teaching got a job as a travelling writer for Canadian newspapers and wrote.